Population and geographic range dynamics: Implications for conservation planning

Mace, Georgina M., Collen, Ben, Fuller, Richard A. and Boakes, Elizabeth H, (2010) Population and geographic range dynamics: Implications for conservation planning. Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B - Biological Sciences, 365 1558: 3743-3751. doi:10.1098/rstb.2010.0264


Author Mace, Georgina M.
Collen, Ben
Fuller, Richard A.
Boakes, Elizabeth H,
Title Population and geographic range dynamics: Implications for conservation planning
Journal name Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society B - Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8436
1471-2970
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2010.0264
Volume 365
Issue 1558
Start page 3743
End page 3751
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Continuing downward trends in the population sizes of many species, in the conservation status of threatened species, and in the quality, extent and connectedness of habitats are of increasing concern. Identifying the attributes of declining populations will help predict how biodiversity will be impacted and guide conservation actions. However, the drivers of biodiversity declines have changed over time and average trends in abundance or distributional change hide significant variation among species. While some populations are declining rapidly, the majority remain relatively stable and others are increasing. Here we dissect out some of the changing drivers of population and geographic range change, and identify biological and geographical correlates of winners and losers in two large datasets covering local population sizes of vertebrates since 1970 and the distributions of Galliform birds over the last two centuries. We find weak evidence for ecological and biological traits being predictors of local decline in range or abundance, but stronger evidence for the role of local anthropogenic threats and environmental change. An improved understanding of the dynamics of threat processes and how they may affect different species will help to guide better conservation planning in a continuously changing world. © 2010 The Royal Society.
Keyword Threat drivers
Population abundance
Geographic range contraction
Extinction risk
Conservation planning
Range dynamics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 22 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 05 Dec 2010, 00:03:07 EST