The brain drain of South Pacific Island nations : an econometric investigation into the factors which influence migration decisions of skilled health professionals

Usher, Sarah. (2004). The brain drain of South Pacific Island nations : an econometric investigation into the factors which influence migration decisions of skilled health professionals Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Usher, Sarah.
Thesis Title The brain drain of South Pacific Island nations : an econometric investigation into the factors which influence migration decisions of skilled health professionals
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2004
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 123
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract
The globalisation of health care has in part seen an acceleration in the migration of doctors and nurses from the Pacific Island nations of Fiji, Samoa, and Tonga to the Pacific periphery, notably Australia and New Zealand. However few studies have been conducted determining the motivations behind skilled health professional's (SHP's) decision and intentions to migrate. While it is commonly acknowledged the central goal behind migration is to improve one's living standards and quality of life, it must be noted that key motivating reasons behind a migration decision is often case or group specific. A recent study of 251 doctors and nurses from the Pacific island nations was conducted by Brown and Connell (2004), where econometric methods were employed in analysing the key determinants behind SHPs present migration status and future migration intentions. However, Brown and Connell's models neglected to incorporate certain variables relating to such factors as human capital, the desire to improve education, career prospects, and the opportunity to access better medical and healthcare facilities for which survey data were available. Therefore this thesis puts forward an alternative model analysing current migrant intentions to remigrate in the future. It was found that current migrant SHP's intentions are influenced not exclusively by income motivations, but also by the desire to gain overseas labour market experience, access to better educational opportunities for their children, and to be with close friends and family. It must be noted that remittances and return migration, alongside business investment, bring some benefits to compensate for the skill drain. While migration cannot be prevented, developing countries experiencing brain drain should be focusing on policies that encourage return migration of their SHPs.

 
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Created: Fri, 03 Dec 2010, 15:11:52 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of Social Sciences and Humanities Library Service