Assessing the cost effectiveness of alcohol taxation and increasing the minimum legal drinking age from 18 to 21 years specifically for the 16-20 Australian female population

McMillan, Shelley. (2006). Assessing the cost effectiveness of alcohol taxation and increasing the minimum legal drinking age from 18 to 21 years specifically for the 16-20 Australian female population Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author McMillan, Shelley.
Thesis Title Assessing the cost effectiveness of alcohol taxation and increasing the minimum legal drinking age from 18 to 21 years specifically for the 16-20 Australian female population
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2006
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 105
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract This thesis considers the impact on health outcomes and economic costs associated with interventions designed to reduce the prevalence of harmful alcohol consumption amongst 16-20 year old females in Australia. The two interventions considered are the introduction of taxation on alcoholic beverages and increasing the minimum legal drinking age from 18 to 21 years.

Previous studies have identified both interventions are cost effective measures to help reduce hazardous drinking in the Australian population. The assessment of these interventions is timely and relevant to the Australian context, given they are both discussed as part of the 2006-2009 National Alcohol Strategy.

This study has been conducted using a cost utility analysis framework, which takes into account the epidemiological and economic data, with uncertainty in the parameters tested via non-parametric bootstrapping. The model is robust in terms of the sensitivity analysis. Given this study is the first to assess the cost effectiveness of the change in taxation structures and increasing the minimum legal drinking age from 18 to 21 years specifically for the 16-20 year old female population, it adds to the existing literature on cost effectiveness analysis.


 
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Created: Fri, 03 Dec 2010, 09:31:30 EST by Ning Jing on behalf of The University of Queensland Library