Magnitude and kinetics of metal rhizotoxicity in cowpea

Kopittke, Peter M., Blamey, F. Pax C., Wehr, J. Bernhard and Menzies, Neal W. (2010). Magnitude and kinetics of metal rhizotoxicity in cowpea. In: Robert J. Gilkes and Nattaporn Prakongkep, Proceedings of: 19th World Congress of Soil Science. Soil Solutions for a Changing World. 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Brisbane, QLD, Australia, (177-180). 1-6 August 2010.


Author Kopittke, Peter M.
Blamey, F. Pax C.
Wehr, J. Bernhard
Menzies, Neal W.
Title of paper Magnitude and kinetics of metal rhizotoxicity in cowpea
Conference name 19th World Congress of Soil Science
Conference location Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Conference dates 1-6 August 2010
Convener International Union of Soil Sciences
Proceedings title Proceedings of: 19th World Congress of Soil Science. Soil Solutions for a Changing World
Place of Publication Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Publisher International Union of Soil Sciences
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780646537832
0646537830
Editor Robert J. Gilkes
Nattaporn Prakongkep
Start page 177
End page 180
Total pages 4
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Many difficulties exist in establishing the concentrations of metals in solution that are toxic to the growth of plant roots. To limit these difficulties, short-term solution culture experiments were conducted using the same technique on 3-d-old cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.) cv. Caloona seedlings. These were grown for 48 h in solutions with ca. 1000 >M Ca and 5 >M B plus one of 24 metals, concentrations of which were determined after filtering (0.22 >m). The decrease in root elongation rate (RER) varied markedly among the metals tested, with a 50 % reduction in RER (i.e. EC50) evident at 0.02 >M Ag to 132 mM K. The rapidity with which RER was reduced varied also, as did the symptoms of rhizotoxicity. A range of metals caused rupturing of the rhizodermis and outer cortex in the roots elongation and transition zones within 2 – 24 h of exposure. These metals were all highly rhizotoxic, but not all highly rhizotoxic metals caused ruptures. We conclude that rhizotoxicity results from disruption of a range of underlying biochemical mechanisms. There were some common effects, but no metal could be considered an analogue for another in all respects.
© 2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World
Keyword Cell wall
Plasmalemma
Root
Rymptoms
Toxicity
Symptoms
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented as Poster "P-0779" during Symposium 3.5.1 "Heavy metal contaminated soils". Published as Conference Paper 0358.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 30 Nov 2010, 09:20:38 EST by Dr Johannes Wehr on behalf of School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences