Setting animal health priorities : a veterinary and economic analysis with special reference to the control of Babesia bovis in Central Queensland

Ramsay, Gavin Campbell. (1997). Setting animal health priorities : a veterinary and economic analysis with special reference to the control of Babesia bovis in Central Queensland PhD Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ramsay, Gavin Campbell.
Thesis Title Setting animal health priorities : a veterinary and economic analysis with special reference to the control of Babesia bovis in Central Queensland
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1997
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Total pages 325
Language eng
Subjects 340000 Economics
Formatted abstract
Animal health information is difficult to collect in extensive grazing systems. To overcome this deficiency in Queensland additional information is being collected by the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The program in which these data are being collected is known as Structured Animal Health Surveillance (SAHS). The information from SAHS is being collected as part of Australia's National Animal Health Information System (NAHIS). The value of the data being collected in SAHS in private decisions on animal health is not being examined as part of the program.

This thesis describes the development and use of a method to determine the value of additional animal health information in decision making on disease control programs and the distribution of those benefits in society. The thesis examines in detail the collection of additional information about disease caused by B. bovis in cattle in the extensively grazed system of Central Queensland. To do this the data collected in SAHS is examined and a disease prediction/vaccination computer simulation model is developed. The model uses additional animal health data being collected in SAHS to determine the incidence and severity of disease. Predictions are then made of the effect of vaccination on disease incidence and severity. Using outputs from the disease prediction/vaccination model as input data the production loss avoided by vaccination is calculated. Discounted cash flow analysis is then used to predict the economic performance criteria of vaccination programs. The value of the information in private decision making is determined using a Bayesian decision theory approach The distribution in society of the benefits of improved productivity in the Central Queensland beef industry is then examined.

Keyword Babesiosis in cattle -- Economic aspects.
Additional Notes Original thesis is missing pages 164 and 165.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Mon, 29 Nov 2010, 15:44:32 EST by Ms Sarah Mcdowell on behalf of Social Sciences and Humanities Library Service