Production and fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum inoculum at elevated carbon dioxide in FACE

Melloy, Paul, Hollaway, Grant, Luck, Jo, Norton, Rob, Aitken, Elizabeth and Chakraborty, Sukumar (2010) Production and fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum inoculum at elevated carbon dioxide in FACE. Global Change Biology, 16 12: 3363-3373. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02178.x


Author Melloy, Paul
Hollaway, Grant
Luck, Jo
Norton, Rob
Aitken, Elizabeth
Chakraborty, Sukumar
Title Production and fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum inoculum at elevated carbon dioxide in FACE
Formatted title
Production and fitness of Fusarium pseudograminearum inoculum at elevated carbon dioxide in FACE
Journal name Global Change Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1354-1013
1365-2486
1460-7212
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-2486.2010.02178.x
Volume 16
Issue 12
Start page 3363
End page 3373
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration is increasingly affecting food production but how plant
diseases will influence production and quality of food under rising CO2 is not well understood. With increased plant
biomass at high CO2 the stubble-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium pseudograminearum causing crown rot (CR) of wheat
may become more severe. We have studied inoculum production by Fusarium using fungal biomass per unit wheat
stubble, stem browning from CR and the saprophytic fitness of Fusarium strains isolated from two wheat varieties
grown in 2007 and 2008 at ambient and elevated CO2 in free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) with or without irrigation
and once in a controlled environment. Fungal biomass, determined using primers for fungal ribosomal 18s and the
TRI5 gene, increased significantly at elevated CO2 in two of the three studies. Stem browning increased significantly at
elevated CO2 in the 2007 FACE study. At elevated CO2 increased stem browning was not influenced by irrigation in a
susceptible variety but in a resistant variety stem browning increased by 68% without irrigation. Wheat variety was
significant in regression models explaining stem browning and Fusarium biomass but pathogen biomass at the two
CO2 levels was not significantly linked to stem browning. Fusarium isolates from ambient and elevated CO2 did not
differ significantly in their saprophytic fitness measured by the rate of colonization of wheat straw. We show that
under elevated CO2 Fusarium inoculum in stubbles will be amplified from increased crop and pathogen biomass while
unimpeded saprophytic fitness will retain its effectiveness. If resistant varieties cannot completely stop infection,
Fusarium will rapidly colonize stubble to further increase inoculum once the crop is harvested. Research should move
beyond documenting the influence of elevated CO2 to developing disease management strategies from improved
knowledge of pathogen biology and host resistance under rising CO2.
© 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Keyword Climate change and plant disease
Crown rot
Disease resistance
Pathogen and CO2
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 28 Nov 2010, 00:06:16 EST