Strategic alliances in high technology industries : an informational perspective on innovation and organization

Hulsman, Jenine Emma. (1989). Strategic alliances in high technology industries : an informational perspective on innovation and organization Honours Thesis, School of Economics, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Hulsman, Jenine Emma.
Thesis Title Strategic alliances in high technology industries : an informational perspective on innovation and organization
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 1989
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 174
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract
      This thesis attempts to provide an information-theoretic perspective on the emergence of a new organizational form in high technology industries - strategic alliances.

      Strategic alliances will be defined as any long term agreement for the mutual exchange or pooling of information. The information pooled may be the product of formal research and development, but it may also include a substantial component of information learnt by "doing". Similarly, strategic alliances need not deal with exclusively technical knowledge; information about other functions of the firm may equally form the basis of a strategic alliance.

      The central feature of this form of information pooling is that its occurrence is bound up with the process of creating or exploiting new technologies. This is a feature of strategic alliances which is not fully examined in the available literature.

      After examining the existing conceptualizations of the innovative process and finding them inadequate for the task at hand, an alternative, information-theoretic approach to innovation will be developed. Innovation will be modelled as an information gathering or "learning" process.

      Three characteristics of information will then be examined: the codifiability characteristic of information; the systemic characteristic of information and the generic characteristic of information.

      It will be suggested that where information is highly systemic and intangible, economies to the widespread application of generic information to new applications may exist. The organizational mechanism by which these economies are exploited may depend on the relative information handling costs which accrue to different organizational forms. It will be suggested that where the pace of change is rapid and information is highly systemic and uncodified, strategic alliances may provide the least costly means of pooling information.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Fri, 26 Nov 2010, 11:29:42 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library