A prospective cross-sectional study to define racial variation in fetal nasal bone length through ultrasound assessment at 18–20 weeks’ gestation

Mogra, Ritu, Schluter, Philip J., Ogle, Robert F., O'Connell, Justine, Fortus, Lou and Hyett, Jon A. (2010) A prospective cross-sectional study to define racial variation in fetal nasal bone length through ultrasound assessment at 18–20 weeks’ gestation. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 50 6: 28-33. doi:10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01226.x

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Author Mogra, Ritu
Schluter, Philip J.
Ogle, Robert F.
O'Connell, Justine
Fortus, Lou
Hyett, Jon A.
Title A prospective cross-sectional study to define racial variation in fetal nasal bone length through ultrasound assessment at 18–20 weeks’ gestation
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8666
1479-828X
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1479-828X.2010.01226.x
Volume 50
Issue 6
Start page 28
End page 33
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, Vic, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective:
An absent or short nasal bone is highly predictive of Down syndrome in Caucasian populations, but Asians may have shorter nasal bones – increasing the false positive rate of screening. We examine differences in nasal bone length (NBL) in Caucasian and Asian populations.
Methods: 
This prospective cohort study involved pregnant women attending for their routine anomaly scan at 18–20 weeks’ gestation. Ethnicity of the patient and their partner was recorded, and the nasal bone was measured three times. Mean NBL was calculated and used to investigate the effect of ethnicity first with a simple linear regression model and second with a mixed-effects regression model that accounted for variability of measurement between sonographers.
Results:
A total of 1087 families were involved in the study, including 592 (54%) Caucasians, 214 (20%) East Asians, 110 (10%) South Asians and 171 (16%) West Asians. Twenty-three sonographers performed the scans with an average of 19 scans each. There is no significant difference in NBL between Caucasian and Asian populations. The mixed-effects model shows that accounting for sonographer variation is important, with 6.7% of the total variance in measurement being related to this random effect.
Conclusions:
There is no significant difference in NBL between Caucasian and Asian populations. It is reasonable to use criteria established in a Caucasian population to define the characteristics of an absent/short nasal bone in Asian fetuses. This finding also removes difficulties in counselling mixed race couples.
© 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.
Keyword Nasal bone
Prenatal diagnosis
Trisomy 21
Ultrasound
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 26 Nov 2010, 11:16:29 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work