The electricity supply industry in Queensland : its development, structure and control, with particular reference to South-Eastern Queensland, 1930-1953

Lack, Clem, 1901-1972. (1967). The electricity supply industry in Queensland : its development, structure and control, with particular reference to South-Eastern Queensland, 1930-1953 Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Lack, Clem, 1901-1972.
Thesis Title The electricity supply industry in Queensland : its development, structure and control, with particular reference to South-Eastern Queensland, 1930-1953
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1967
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 214
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract Electricity supply, which has become essential for economic progress and the achievement of high living standards in any community, has a history in Queensland going back to the early 1880’s. No municipal or State controls over it exist until some years after the first faltering supply was provided and these were, for many decades, not very tight controls.

As a natural monopoly, however, electricity supply was progressively brought under greater control by the Queensland Government, especially after 1933. Its operation is now by semi-governmental bodies, including one, the Southern Electric Authority of Queensland, which differs markedly in structure from other statutory corporations, its constitution having resulted from other statutory corporations, its constitution having resulted from a number of circumstances discussed in this thesis.

The expansion of the electricity supply system in the South-eastern Queensland in the period between 1930 and 1953, when the Southern Electric Authority was established, is studied in the context of the Queensland Government’s aim to spread the benefits of electric power to the sparsely-populated, lesser-developed areas of the State. The various means by which public control was achieved and extended and the types of organisation which evolved are examined and compared with those elsewhere. Problems of conflict which arise and the difficulty of discovering the public interest are also considered.

State and municipal political attitudes which influenced the industry’s growth are brought into focus. In addition, apart from the advancement in technology, specific historical, geographical and financial factors are shown to have been reflected in the constitution of the organisation which regulate or provide electricity supply in Queensland.


 
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