The likelihood of adoption of recently trialled Australian timber species in the Philippines

Venn, Tyron James. (1999). The likelihood of adoption of recently trialled Australian timber species in the Philippines Honours Thesis, School of Economics, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Venn, Tyron James.
Thesis Title The likelihood of adoption of recently trialled Australian timber species in the Philippines
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 1999
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 158
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract This thesis considers the likelihood of the recently trialled Australian tree species being adopted by industrial and farm forest growers in the Philippines. While predominantly a study in forestry economics, the thesis also has a substantial focus on statistical modelling of forest yield and on technology transfer to developing countries. The assessment is based on three factors believed to be slowing the diffusion of Australian forestry technology: (i) uncertainty surrounding potential yields of the Australian tree species; (ii) uncertainty with regard to the financial profitability of the Australian species; and (iii) the social, institutional and other constraints to the adoption of new forestry technologies.

Chapman-Richards nonlinear panel data yield models are developed for selected Australian species being grown in the Philippines. An existing forestry financial model is adapted to suit the operating environment of the Philippines, and the Chapman-Richards yield models are integrated with the financial model. Thorough consideration of financial profitability, and the social, institutional and other constraints, leads to the conclusion that Filipino farmers are unlikely to adopt the Australian species without considerable outside assistance. Conversely, the Australian species, Acacia mangium, is found to have excellent industrial forestry potential and is likely to be adopted.

 
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Created: Wed, 24 Nov 2010, 16:27:02 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library