Chinese urban food consumption : recent trends, future projections, factors underlying change and the implications for Australian exports

Laurenceson, James Stuart. (1994). Chinese urban food consumption : recent trends, future projections, factors underlying change and the implications for Australian exports Honours Thesis, School of Economics, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Laurenceson, James Stuart.
Thesis Title Chinese urban food consumption : recent trends, future projections, factors underlying change and the implications for Australian exports
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 1994
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 108
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract This thesis focuses its attention predominantly on Chinese urban food consumption. The rapid transformation of the economy since the implementation of reforms in 1978, ensure such a study is timely. While these reforms have generally liberalised transactions within the domestic economy, the effects of rationing on Chinese consumer behaviour is still considerable. The most recent trends in urban food consumption suggest a movement away from traditional staples towards higher protein commodities, such as aquatic and diary products. Estimates of consumption demand in the year 2000 reinforce this finding. The performance of Australia's export sector in tapping these markets has been disappointing to date, largely due to the fact that food exports have been concentrated in areas of below average growth in initial investigation into the forces underlying the shift to higher protein foods in China and the Asian region in general, are found to be chiefly derived from the effects of developmental patterns, not explicit Western influence.

 
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Created: Wed, 24 Nov 2010, 14:10:54 EST by Ning Jing on behalf of The University of Queensland Library