Wage determination and the just price : the experience of the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission

Crittall, John. (1981). Wage determination and the just price : the experience of the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission Honours Thesis, School of Economics, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Crittall, John.
Thesis Title Wage determination and the just price : the experience of the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 1981
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 115
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract       The thesis has a three-fold purpose.. It takes as a tacit assumption deriving from the fact that the institution legally established in Australia to arbitrate industrial disputes, especially those involving general wage standards and differentials, was a judicial body, that the practical question of wage fixation is the question of wage-justice. The essay proceeds from a general articulation of this assumption to consider a representative sampling of economic theories of distribution relevant to wages. While a notion of justice is involved it is not generally applicable to wage determination in Australia and the theory of its effective application has us correspondence to the practical situation the Commonwealth Conciliation and Arbitration Commission have experienced since their inception. Secondly, the thesis proceeds to present a summary of the Commission's history, which shows how the Commission came to assume responsibility for central control of wage-fixing and various criteria it has adopted for determining the general wage rate. Finally, by considering the recent history of the Commission in the area of relativities or "earnings-drift" and "indexation" the thesis reveals more by inference, the complexities which confront such a body which does not have electoral responsibility for comprehensive economic policy in trying to achieve wage- justice. The conclusion, again implicit, is that because wage-justice is symptomatic of the basic tension in any political society, the Commission's shortcomings as an effective wage-fixing body are due to the partisan political influences and pressures to which they have been subjected.

 
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Created: Wed, 24 Nov 2010, 11:10:32 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library