Mucolytic bacteria with increased prevalence in IBD mucosa augment in vitro utilization of mucin by other bacteria

Png, CW, Linden, SK, Gilshenan, KS, Zoetendal, EG, McSweeney, CS, Sly, LI, McGuckin, MA and Florin, THJ (2010) Mucolytic bacteria with increased prevalence in IBD mucosa augment in vitro utilization of mucin by other bacteria. American Journal of Gastroenterology, 105 11: 2420-2428. doi:10.1038/ajg.2010.281


Author Png, CW
Linden, SK
Gilshenan, KS
Zoetendal, EG
McSweeney, CS
Sly, LI
McGuckin, MA
Florin, THJ
Title Mucolytic bacteria with increased prevalence in IBD mucosa augment in vitro utilization of mucin by other bacteria
Formatted title
Mucolytic bacteria with increased prevalence in IBD mucosa augment in vitro utilization of mucin by other bacteria
Journal name American Journal of Gastroenterology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-9270
1572-0241
1948-9498
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/ajg.2010.281
Volume 105
Issue 11
Start page 2420
End page 2428
Total pages 9
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives:
Mucosa-associated bacteria are increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which suggests the possibility of an increased source of digestible endogenous mucus substrate. We hypothesized that mucolytic bacteria are increased in IBD, providing increased substrate to sustain nonmucolytic mucosa-associated bacteria.

Methods:
Mucolytic bacteria were characterized by the ability to degrade human secretory mucin (MUC2) in pure and mixed anaerobic cultures. Real-time PCR was used to enumerate mucosa-associated mucolytic bacteria in 46 IBD and 20 control patients. Bacterial mucolytic activity was tested in vitro using purified human MUC2.

Results:
We confirm increased total mucosa-associated bacteria 16S rRNA gene in macroscopically and histologically normal intestinal epithelium of both Crohn's disease (CD) (mean 1.9-fold) and ulcerative colitis (UC) (mean 1.3-fold). We found a disproportionate increase in some mucolytic bacteria. Mean Ruminococcus gnavus were increased >4-fold and Ruminococcus torques ~100-fold in macroscopically and histologically normal intestinal epithelium of both CD and UC. The most abundantly detected mucolytic bacterium in controls, Akkermansia muciniphila, was reduced many fold in CD and in UC. Coculture of A. muciniphila with MUC2 as the sole carbon source led to reduction in its abundance while it augmented growth of other bacteria.

Conclusions:
Mucolytic bacteria are present in healthy humans, where they are an integral part of the mucosa-associated bacterial consortium. The disproportionate increase in R. gnavus and R. torques could explain increased total mucosa-associated bacteria in IBD.
© 2011 The American College of Gastroenterology
Keyword Human colon ecosystems
Inflammatory bowel diseases
Polymerase chain reaction
Genome wide association
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 21 Nov 2010, 00:09:50 EST