Role of respiratory viruses in acute upper and lower respiratory tract illness in the first year of life - A birth cohort study

Kusel, Merci M. H., de Klerk, Nicholas H., Holt, Patrick G., Kebadze, Tatiana, Johnston, Sebastian L. and Sly, Peter D. (2006) Role of respiratory viruses in acute upper and lower respiratory tract illness in the first year of life - A birth cohort study. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 25 8: 680-686. doi:10.1097/01.inf.0000226912.88900.a3


Author Kusel, Merci M. H.
de Klerk, Nicholas H.
Holt, Patrick G.
Kebadze, Tatiana
Johnston, Sebastian L.
Sly, Peter D.
Title Role of respiratory viruses in acute upper and lower respiratory tract illness in the first year of life - A birth cohort study
Journal name Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0891-3668
1532-0987
Publication date 2006-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/01.inf.0000226912.88900.a3
Volume 25
Issue 8
Start page 680
End page 686
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract INTRODUCTION: Although acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) are major causes of morbidity and mortality in early childhood worldwide, little progress has been made in their control and prophylaxis. Most studies have focused on hospitalized children or children from closed populations. It is essential that the viral etiology of these clinical diseases be accurately defined in the development of antiviral drugs. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of all common respiratory viruses as upper and lower respiratory tract pathogens in the first year of life. STUDY DESIGN: This community-based birth cohort study prospectively collected detailed information on all ARI contracted by 263 infants from birth until 1 year of age. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected for each ARI episode, and all common respiratory viruses were detected by polymerase chain reaction. Episodes were classified as upper respiratory illnesses or lower respiratory illnesses (LRI), with or without wheeze. RESULTS: The majority reported 2-5 episodes of ARI in the first year (range, 0-11 episodes; mean, 4.1). One-third were LRI, and 29% of these were associated with wheeze. Viruses were detected in 69% of ARI; most common were rhinoviruses (48.5%) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (10.9%). Compared with RSV, >10 times the number of upper respiratory illnesses and >3 times the number of both LRI and wheezing LRI were attributed to rhinoviruses. CONCLUSION: Rhinoviruses are the major upper and lower respiratory pathogens in the first year of life. Although RSV is strongly associated with severe LRI requiring hospitalization, the role of rhinoviruses as the major lower respiratory pathogens in infants has not previously been recognized.
Keyword respiratory viruses
rhinovirus
respiratory syncytial virus
respiratory infections
childhood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 17 Nov 2010, 11:35:39 EST