A human factors approach to observation chart design can improve the detection of clinical deterioration

Preece, Megan, Horswill, Mark, Hill, Andrew, Christofidis, Melany and Watson, Marcus (2010). A human factors approach to observation chart design can improve the detection of clinical deterioration. In: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Annual Conference 2010, Sunshine Coast, Australia, (). 31 Oct- 2 Nov 2010.

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Author Preece, Megan
Horswill, Mark
Hill, Andrew
Christofidis, Melany
Watson, Marcus
Title of paper A human factors approach to observation chart design can improve the detection of clinical deterioration
Conference name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society of Australia Annual Conference 2010
Conference location Sunshine Coast, Australia
Conference dates 31 Oct- 2 Nov 2010
Publication Year 2010
Year available 2010
Sub-type Poster
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background and aim: Hospital observation charts are the principal means of monitoring changes to patients’ vital signs. However, there is a lack of empirical research on their performance. Reported here is a program of research aimed at empirically validating an observation chart, using a human factors approach.

Methods: First, a heuristic analysis was used to review the design of 25 Australasian observation charts. Second, two new charts were designed with reference to principles of user-centred design. Third, the two new charts and four existing charts were tested in two experiments. The first experiment measured users’ ability to detect patient deterioration, when patient data was presented on the 6 charts. The second measured the number of errors committed when users recorded observations on the 6 charts.

Results:
Chart design had a significant effect on users’ performance in the two experiments. Overall, the two newly designed charts performed the best across several metrics (i.e. decision accuracy, response time, and recording accuracy).

Conclusions: Differences in the design of observation charts can affect chart users’ performance. Therefore, it is recommended that charts that are not well-designed be discarded in favour of charts with empirically-demonstrated effectiveness. Improving the standard of observation charts used in hospitals may improve the detection of patient deterioration.
Subjects 111711 Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
170112 Sensory Processes, Perception and Performance
920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classified
1203 Design Practice and Management
Keyword observation charts
medical charts
Patient safety
usability
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Evidence gathered via PDF from author

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Nov 2010, 19:32:30 EST by Miss Megan Preece on behalf of School of Psychology