The effects of normalisation on the user information satisfaction of novice end users

Benedict, Conrad. (1995). The effects of normalisation on the user information satisfaction of novice end users Honours Thesis, Dept. of Commerce, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Benedict, Conrad.
Thesis Title The effects of normalisation on the user information satisfaction of novice end users
School, Centre or Institute Dept. of Commerce
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1995
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 74
Language eng
Subjects 15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
Formatted abstract The use of relational database technology has grown significantly in recent years. Incorporating the human aspects of database technology such as end-user satisfaction is not yet common, however, and database designers may inadequately address the needs of their users. This exploratory research identified some of the structural characteristics of relational databases that significantly affect the complexity of database tasks and thereby impact on end-user satisfaction.

This study investigated the effects of the following factors on end-user information satisfaction: (a) repeating fields or groups of data, (b) data non-atomicity, (c) data structure fragmentation, and (d) functional dependencies. The study posits a general function of user satisfaction that applies across different levels of normalisation. The data analysis provided support for the proposition that atomicity affect user satisfaction when querying and inputting data. Support was also found for the proposition that repeating fields affect the satisfaction of users inputting data. Some support was found that users preferred inputting at higher levels of normalisation. The data analysis did not provide statistically significant support for the proposition that repeating fields affect user satisfaction when querying data. Results did not support the propositions that fragmentation affects user satisfaction when querying and inputting data. An analysis of the input sessions revealed that most participants did not take advantage of the structural benefits afforded by higher levels of normalisation. Training and education may be required for users to realise the implications of different levels of normalisation for input. The lack of statistical significance for some queries was primarily due to time limitations placed on participants that prevented them from completing tasks that highlighted the structural characteristics of higher normal forms.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Tue, 16 Nov 2010, 12:37:58 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library