Physiological and anthropometric correlates of tackling ability in junior elite and subelite rugby league players

Gabbett, Tim J., Jenkins, David G. and Abernethy, Bruce (2010) Physiological and anthropometric correlates of tackling ability in junior elite and subelite rugby league players. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 24 11: 2989-2995. doi:10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181f00d22


Author Gabbett, Tim J.
Jenkins, David G.
Abernethy, Bruce
Title Physiological and anthropometric correlates of tackling ability in junior elite and subelite rugby league players
Journal name Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1064-8011
1533-4287
Publication date 2010-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181f00d22
Volume 24
Issue 11
Start page 2989
End page 2995
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, P.A., U.S.A.
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Abstract: Gabbett, TJ, Jenkins, DG, and Abernethy, B. Physiological and anthropometric correlates of tackling ability in junior elite and subelite rugby league players. J Strength Cond Res 24(11): 2989-2995, 2010-This study investigated the tackling ability of junior elite and subelite rugby league players, and determined the relationship between selected physiological and anthropometric characteristics and tackling ability in these athletes. Twenty-eight junior elite (mean +/- SD age, 16.0 +/- 0.2 years) and 13 junior subelite (mean +/- SD age, 15.9 +/- 0.6 years) rugby league players underwent a standardized 1-on-1 tackling drill in a 10-m grid. Video footage was taken from the rear, side, and front of the defending player. Tackling proficiency was assessed using standardized technical criteria. In addition, all players underwent measurements of standard anthropometry (stature, body mass, and sum of 7 skinfolds), acceleration (10-m sprint), change of direction speed (505 test), and lower body muscular power (vertical jump). Junior elite players had significantly greater (p < 0.05) tackling proficiency than junior subelite players (65.7 +/- 12.5 vs. 54.3 +/- 16.8%). Junior elite players tended to be taller, heavier, leaner, and have greater acceleration, change of direction speed, and muscular power, than the junior subelite players. The strongest individual correlates of tackling ability were acceleration (r = 0.60, p < 0.001) and lower body muscular power (r = 0.38, p < 0.05). When multiple linear regression analysis was performed to determine which of the physiological and anthropometric characteristics predicted tackling ability, fast acceleration was the only variable that contributed significantly (r(2) = 0.24, p < 0.01) to the predictive model. These findings demonstrate that fast acceleration, and to a lesser extent, lower body muscular power contribute to effective tackling ability in junior rugby league players. From a practical perspective, strength and conditioning coaches should emphasize the development of acceleration and lower body muscular power qualities to improve tackling ability in junior rugby league players.
Keyword skill
physique
defense
fitness
correlation
Playing positions
Risk-factors
Injury
football
Speed
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 14 Nov 2010, 00:01:33 EST