An investigation into the relationship between income and food consumption in the rapidly growing economies of East and South-East Asia

Armbrust, Eric K. (1993). An investigation into the relationship between income and food consumption in the rapidly growing economies of East and South-East Asia Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Armbrust, Eric K.
Thesis Title An investigation into the relationship between income and food consumption in the rapidly growing economies of East and South-East Asia
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1993
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 139
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract       This focus of this thesis is on the patterns of food consumption evident in the East and South-East Asian region between 1970 and 1990. It investigates the relatiol1ship between the .consumption of selected food commodities and income over this period. The aim of the thesis was to suggest possible effects which continued income growth in this region may have on future food consumption patterns. The possible implications of these trends for future Australian exports of beef, wheat and dairy products to this region are also discussed.

      The results indicate that a significant relationship exists between income and food consumption in East and South-East Asia. They indicate that the rapid growth in income levels achieved by many of the East and South-East Asian nations has led to a transition in the diets of these countries away from traditional staple foods such as rice, towards higher protein foods and particularly dairy products. In addition, they suggest that Australia has concentrated its export activity to this region on commodities which may not experience the rapid growth in import expected in the coming decades.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Fri, 12 Nov 2010, 12:09:37 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library