Despite major structural developments affecting the world sugar market : is the market fundamentally cyclical in the 1980s? How can Australia respond to the altered international environment?

Barra, Steven Paul. (1985). Despite major structural developments affecting the world sugar market : is the market fundamentally cyclical in the 1980s? How can Australia respond to the altered international environment? Honours Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Barra, Steven Paul.
Thesis Title Despite major structural developments affecting the world sugar market : is the market fundamentally cyclical in the 1980s? How can Australia respond to the altered international environment?
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1985
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 163
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract       Despite the structural developments of recent years (including the effect of price support policies, alternative sweetener competition and falling rates of consumption growth) accompanied by ineffective ISAs, is the residual world sugar market fundamentally cyclical in the 1980s and beyond? How can Australia respond to the altered international environment?

      The study surveys the export-dependency of the Australian sugar industry and structural developments which have occurred in the world market. It examines the experience of the sugar cycle since the Korean War boom in a comparative context with other commodity cycles; and it discusses economic theory which is considered to be pertinent to the topic.

      The major conclusion reached is that the fundamental forces affecting the world sugar economy have not eliminated the cyclical nature of free market prices. However, the cycle is expected to be elongated and reduced in amplitude in future. Chapter six examines some possible policy options for the Australian industry. As real returns are likely to be lower on average than they have been in the past, it is to the industry's financial advantage to reduce costs, whether it be via government policy or restructuring. Alternative land uses are considered. Australia's comparative advantage currently lies in raw sugar but this may alter in future.

 
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Created: Fri, 12 Nov 2010, 11:48:14 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library