Using cognitive work analysis techniques to identify human factor hazards

Hassall, M. E., Sanderson, P. M. and Cameron, I. T. (2010). Using cognitive work analysis techniques to identify human factor hazards. In: Scott MacDonald, HFES 2010: Proceedings of fhe Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting. 54th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, San Francisco, CA, U.S.A., (269-273). 27 September-1 October 2010.

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HERDC_checklist.pdf HERDC checklist – not publicly available application/pdf 60.79KB 2
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Author Hassall, M. E.
Sanderson, P. M.
Cameron, I. T.
Title of paper Using cognitive work analysis techniques to identify human factor hazards
Conference name 54th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Conference location San Francisco, CA, U.S.A.
Conference dates 27 September-1 October 2010
Proceedings title HFES 2010: Proceedings of fhe Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting. Proceedings   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Santa Monica, CA, U.S.A.
Publisher Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-0-945289-37-1
0945289375
ISSN 1071-1813
1541-9312
Editor Scott MacDonald
Volume 2010
Start page 269
End page 273
Total pages 5
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Accidents in the process industries can be attributed, at least in part, to human causes. Hazard studies are commonly used in industry to identify and manage risks. This paper describes a methodology, called HumHID, which potentially improves hazard identification associated with human factors. The approach is based on cognitive work analysis (CWA) techniques, human factors/error taxonomies and the blended hazard methodology (BLHAZID). A desktop case study is used to illustrate the application of the methodology. The results show that a combination of CWA, human factors/error taxonomies and BLHAZID techniques provides a structured means of identifying hazards associated with human activity as well as showing the causality behind the hazards which can be used to guide redesign work.
Copyright 2010 by Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Inc. All rights reserved.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during the Session "CE1 – Cognitive Engineering Methodology". Full conference title: "HFES 2010: Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 54th Annual Meeting".

 
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Created: Thu, 11 Nov 2010, 18:22:19 EST by Professor Penelope Sanderson on behalf of School of Information Technol and Elec Engineering