When things go wrong : cognitive, emotional and behavioural responses to service recovery strategies

Keeffe, Dominique A. (2005). When things go wrong : cognitive, emotional and behavioural responses to service recovery strategies Honours Thesis, School of Business, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
THE19040.pdf Full text application/pdf 5.44MB 3
Author Keeffe, Dominique A.
Thesis Title When things go wrong : cognitive, emotional and behavioural responses to service recovery strategies
School, Centre or Institute School of Business
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2005
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 120
Language eng
Subjects 1503 Business and Management
Formatted abstract Despite the best intentions of service providers and organisations, service delivery is rarely errorfree. While numerous studies have investigated specific cognitive, emotional or behavioural responses to service failure and recovery, these studies do not fully capture the complexity of the servicescape. Consequently, this research develops a more holistic understanding of how specific service recovery strategies affect the responses of customers by combining two existing models-Smith & Bolton's (2002) model of emotional responses to service performance and Fullerton and Punj's (1993) structural model of aberrant consumer behaviour-into a conceptual framework. Specific service recovery strategies are proposed to influence consumer cognition, emotion and behaviour.

This research was conducted using a 2x2 between-subjects quasi-experimental design that was administered via written survey. The experimental design manipulated two levels of two specific service recovery strategies: compensation and apology. The effect of the four recovery strategies were investigated by collecting data from 18-25 year olds and were analysed using multivariate analysis of covariance and multiple regression analysis. The results suggest that specific service recovery efforts can be linked to differing levels of satisfaction, distributive justice, positive emotions, negative emotions and behaviour (be it functional or dysfunctional). Satisfaction and emotions also predict varying levels of discrete behaviour. No support was found for any interaction effects between cognition and emotion or any effect of distributive justice on behaviour. These finding have significant implications for the theory and practice of managing service recovery.

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 199 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 10 Nov 2010, 12:47:42 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library