Accuracy of body mass index estimated from self-reported height and weight in mid-aged Australian women

Burton, Nicola W., Brown, Wendy and Dobson, Annette (2010) Accuracy of body mass index estimated from self-reported height and weight in mid-aged Australian women. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 6: 620-623.


Author Burton, Nicola W.
Brown, Wendy
Dobson, Annette
Title Accuracy of body mass index estimated from self-reported height and weight in mid-aged Australian women
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00618.x
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 620
End page 623
Total pages 4
Editor Jeanne Daly
Judith Lumley
Place of publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
920507 Women's Health
Formatted abstract Objective: To assess the accuracy of body mass index (BMI) estimated from self-reported height and weight from a mailed survey, in a population-based sample of mid-aged Australian women.

Methods: One hundred and fifty nine women (age 54–59 years) were recruited from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH). Participants provided height and weight data in a mailed survey and were then measured (Brisbane, Australia 2005). Differences between self-reported and measured data were examined by plotting against the measured values and using paired t-tests and kappa statistics. Factors associated with biased reporting were assessed using regression models.

Results: Both self-reported height and weight tended to be underestimated, with a mean difference of 0.67 cm (95% CI 0.26 to1.08 cm) and 0.95 kg (95% CI 0.44 to1.47 kg) respectively. Reported height and derived BMI was more accurate among married women than single women (average difference of 1.28 cm, 95% CI 0.19 to 2.37 cm and –1.00 kg/m2, 95%CI –1.69 to –0.30, respectively). Women with BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2 reported weight more accurately than obese women (average difference of 2.26 kg, 95% CI 0.14 to 4.38 kg). There was 84% agreement between BMI categories derived from self-reported and measured data, with 85%, 73% and 94% of women correctly classified as obese, overweight, and healthy BMI using self-reported data and kappa=0.81.

Conclusions: There is substantial agreement between self-reported and measured height and weight data for mid-aged women, especially among married and healthy weight women. Implications: Population-based studies among mid-aged women in Australia can use self-reported data obtained from mailed surveys to derive BMI estimates.

Implications: Population-based studies among mid-aged women in Australia can use self-reported data obtained from mailed surveys to derive BMI estimates.
© 2010 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2010 Public Health Association of Australia
Keyword Validity
Accuracy
Height
Weight
Body mass index
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Human Movement Studies Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 07 Nov 2010, 13:17:35 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement Studies