Comparison of self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time and weekly time-use: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health

van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z., Watson, Melanie J., Dobson, Annette J. and Brown, Wendy J. (2011) Comparison of self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time and weekly time-use: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 18 3: 221-228. doi:10.1007/s12529-010-9105-x


Author van Uffelen, Jannique G.Z.
Watson, Melanie J.
Dobson, Annette J.
Brown, Wendy J.
Title Comparison of self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time and weekly time-use: Results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Journal name International Journal of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1070-5503
1532-7558
Publication date 2011-09
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12529-010-9105-x
Volume 18
Issue 3
Start page 221
End page 228
Total pages 8
Editor Joost Dekker
Place of publication New York, N.Y., U.S.A.
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
920507 Women's Health
111712 Health Promotion
Formatted abstract
Background: The study of sedentary behavior is a relatively new area in population health research, and little is known about patterns of sitting time on week-days and weekend-days.
Purpose: To compare self-reported week-day and weekend-day sitting time with reported weekly time spent in other activities.
Method: Data were from 8,717 women born between 1973 and 1978 ('younger'), and 10,490 women born between 1946 and 1951 ('mid-age') who completed surveys for the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health in 2003 and 2001, respectively. They were asked about time spent sitting on week-days and weekend-days. The women were also asked to report time spent in employment, active leisure, passive leisure, home duties, and studying. Mean week-day and weekend-day sitting times were compared with time-use using analysis of variance. Results: Younger women sat more than mid-aged women, and sitting time was higher on week-days than on weekend-days in both cohorts. There were marked positive associations between week-day and weekend-day sitting times and time spent in passive leisure in both cohorts, and with time spent studying on week-days for the younger women. Week-day sitting time was markedly higher in women who reported >35 h in employment, compared with those who worked <35 h. In contrast, there were inverse associations between sitting time and time spent in home duties. Associations between sitting and active leisure were less consistent.
Conclusion: Although week-day sitting time was higher than weekend-day sitting time, the patterns of the relationships between week-day and weekend-day sitting and time-use were largely similar, except for time spent in employment.
© 2010 International Society of Behavioral Medicine.
Keyword Sedentary behavior
Time-use
Epidemiologic assessment
Survey
Women
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 6 June 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sat, 06 Nov 2010, 15:22:48 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences