Consumer decision-making styles : a cross-cultural study between Singaporeans and Australians

Leo, Cheryl. (2002). Consumer decision-making styles : a cross-cultural study between Singaporeans and Australians Honours Thesis, School of Business, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Leo, Cheryl.
Thesis Title Consumer decision-making styles : a cross-cultural study between Singaporeans and Australians
School, Centre or Institute School of Business
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2002
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 112
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract This thesis investigates consumer decision-making styles between Australians and Singaporeans. Defined as a mental orientation towards making choices (Sproles & Kendall, 1986), previous research has focused on the personality perspective to investigate consumer decision-making styles in different countries. This study uses a cultural perspective to investigate eastern and western differences in consumer decision-making styles. It extends current research into two different countries (Singapore and Australia) and product types (generic goods and services). The purpose of this thesis was to test cultural differences on the 8 consumer decision making styles and product categories of goods and services. A quantitative mail survey that incorporated the consumer styles index was utilized for this. The respondents were randomly selected consumers of Singapore and Australia of age between 18 to 45. The results were analyzed using multivariate analysis of variance. The results revealed that there were cultural differences between Singapore and Australia for all decision-making styles when purchasing goods and services. It also suggests that generic east versus west models may not be applicable to specific cultures.

 
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