Cashing in on crashes : brand placement in computer games and the effects of experience and flow on memory

Schneider, Lars-Peter. (2002). Cashing in on crashes : brand placement in computer games and the effects of experience and flow on memory Honours Thesis, School of Business, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Schneider, Lars-Peter.
Thesis Title Cashing in on crashes : brand placement in computer games and the effects of experience and flow on memory
School, Centre or Institute School of Business
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2002
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 68
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract The practise of placing brand names, logos, and products into computer games is becoming increasingly popular as marketers strive to reach the fickle consumers of today. Recent academic work in the area of brand placement has focussed on movies and television, with only one other piece of research to date tackling the issue of computer game placements. This thesis investigated the etfectivel1ess of different banners in terms of recall and recognition, as well as the effects of computer game experience on participants' memories of banners. Furthermore, the psychological state of flow was measured in an attempt to understand the theoretical underpinnings of the phenomena. Banners that were high in spatial prominence presented with higher recall and recognition levels, however subtle banners that were able to influence the actions of the players were also able to increase their effect on memory. The concept of flow was not supported, even going so far as to present negative relationships counter to those initially hypothesised. Reasons for these and other findings are discussed, followed by limitations and potential areas for future research. Broad recommendations are also provided, resulting from the amalgamation of past research, the findings of this thesis, and input from industry professionals. Ultimately, this thesis supports the practise of brand placement within computer games as an effective marketing tool, capable of reaching highly attractive groups of consumers.

 
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