Regional economic development in Fiji : an examination of some issues and alternatives

Tabua, Sevanaia B. (1988). Regional economic development in Fiji : an examination of some issues and alternatives Master's Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Tabua, Sevanaia B.
Thesis Title Regional economic development in Fiji : an examination of some issues and alternatives
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1988
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Total pages 80
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract
Equity in the distribution of the future of development remains a difficult regional problem in both the developed and less developed countries today. Most theories and explanation of this problem are formulated and oriented to the conditions of the regions in the developed countries. The socio-economic conditions in the less developed countries are different and therefore require a different approach.

It is suggested that the approach in the less developed countries should be oriented to primary satisfy the needs and wants of their inhabitants before the traditional functional role of these countries with respect to their international relation is considered. This perspective is very much at odds with the predominant world economic relation where regions are intertwined into the interdependent global economic system.

In many less developed countries, the recognition of this regional problem is reflected, in one way or another, in their national development programmes. Despite this awareness, regional inequality still persists and is widening.

This study examines the status of regional growth strategies in the context of national development in Fiji. It advocates a redirection of growth and development strategy from the present functional role to that of needs-based.


Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Sat, 06 Nov 2010, 10:23:44 EST by Ning Jing on behalf of The University of Queensland Library