Adoption of executive information systems in the Queensland public service: a case study

Gardiner, Adrian. (1993). Adoption of executive information systems in the Queensland public service: a case study Master's Thesis, Dept. of Commerce, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
THE14223.pdf Full text Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/pdf 6.97MB 0
Author Gardiner, Adrian.
Thesis Title Adoption of executive information systems in the Queensland public service: a case study
School, Centre or Institute Dept. of Commerce
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1993
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Total pages 172
Language eng
Subjects 0806 Information Systems
Formatted abstract Executive Information Systems (EISs) have had high failure rates, attributed primarily to users' attitudes or preconceptions rather than the technical deficiencies of the EIS. There is still not a clear understanding of why some people decide to use an EIS, while others reject it. This study therefore focuses on decision processes employed by executives in deciding whether to adopt or reject EIS use. In particular, this study seeks to identify key decision variables. The findings of this study are important as they may assist EIS technical support and EIS operating sponsors to concentrate efforts and resources to enhance EIS adoption and exploitation.

This study used Rogers' innovation-decision process model as a theoretical basis to explore EIS adoption and rejection. A number of case studies were performed of executives in the Queensland Public Service to determine how they made their adoption or rejection decisions. The findings of this study indicate that the key factors affecting executives' EIS adoption behaviour are perceived economic related relative advantage of EIS use over previous information systems, perceived low complexity of EIS use, having a perceived need for better access to data or decision making support, and perceiving EIS use to be compatible with one's own beliefs and past experiences.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 98 Abstract Views, 0 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 03 Nov 2010, 11:30:41 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of The University of Queensland Library