Relevance, formality, and process : a model for the evaluation of systems analysis methodologies

Smythe, Errol. (1993). Relevance, formality, and process : a model for the evaluation of systems analysis methodologies Honours Thesis, School of Business, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Smythe, Errol.
Thesis Title Relevance, formality, and process : a model for the evaluation of systems analysis methodologies
School, Centre or Institute School of Business
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1993
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 155
Language eng
Subjects 1402 Applied Economics
Formatted abstract
This research explored the concepts of relevance, formality, and process as elements of information systems analysis methodologies. The research attempted to refine the concepts and to incorporate them into a framework for the evaluation of information systems analysis methodologies. Based on the development of the concepts within the research, a model was proposed which links the three concepts to assumptions of ontology and epistemology.

The model was tested by evaluating an object-oriented analysis methodology. The model was successfully operationalised and the results were used to evaluate the methodology in terms of the three themes of relevance, formality, and process. The methodology was found to be suitable for use in a well-defined problem domain. Potential weaknesses were identified in the methodology, especially with respect to project management.

The model is still in its infancy and requires a great deal of development before it can serve adequately for either theory or practice. The model presents rich opportunities for future research and should serve to focus attention on neglected aspects of information systems theory.


 
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Created: Tue, 02 Nov 2010, 16:23:12 EST by Ning Jing on behalf of The University of Queensland Library