An empirical study of sex- related access discrimination: the role of information complexity and ambiguity

Colbran, Stephen. (1984). An empirical study of sex- related access discrimination: the role of information complexity and ambiguity Honours Thesis, Dept. of Commerce, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Colbran, Stephen.
Thesis Title An empirical study of sex- related access discrimination: the role of information complexity and ambiguity
School, Centre or Institute Dept. of Commerce
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1984
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 120
Language eng
Subjects 1402 Applied Economics
Formatted abstract The central thesis of this paper researched, to what extent the literature
pertaining to sex-related Access Discrimination; was clarified by the
relative complexity of selection decisions and the point at which and the
order in which sex is used as a critical decision variable for
elimination-by-aspects, if at all.

A comprehensive review of the sex-related Access Discrimination
literature indicated major inconsistencies. Reconciliation; it was argued,
could be achieved through an empirical manipulation of the following
variables: Subject sex, Position title, Job information, Education, Reference material, and applicant sex.

In order) the above independent variables formed the factors within a
split-'plot factorial 2 X 2 X 2 X 2 . 2 X 3 Analysis of Variance. The above
material was presented to 224 student subjects, in the form of a 34 page
decision simulation.

Results on three separate dependent variables [Hireabl11ty, Salary,
Potential for long service], revealed that sex was eliminated as an irrelevant decision factor only when information complexity was high J and associated ambiguity was low.

Such a result verified the validity of the proposed reconciliation of the
sex-related Access Discrimination literature.


 
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