Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals

Cooke, Matthew B., Rybalka, Emma, Stathis, Christos G., Cribb, Paul J. and Hayes, Alan (2010) Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 7 1-9. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-7-30


Author Cooke, Matthew B.
Rybalka, Emma
Stathis, Christos G.
Cribb, Paul J.
Hayes, Alan
Title Whey protein isolate attenuates strength decline after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals
Journal name Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1550-2783
Publication date 2010-09-22
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1550-2783-7-30
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 7
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

We examined the effects of short-term consumption of whey protein isolate on muscle proteins and force recovery after eccentrically-induced muscle damage in healthy individuals.

Methods

Seventeen untrained male participants (23 ± 5 yr, 180 ± 6 cm, 80 ± 11 kg) were randomly separated into two supplement groups: i) whey protein isolate (WPH; n = 9); or ii) carbohydrate (CHO; n = 8). Participants consumed 1.5 g/kg.bw/day supplement (~30 g consumed immediately, and then once with breakfast, lunch, in the afternoon and after the evening meal) for a period of 14 days following a unilateral eccentric contraction-based resistance exercise session, consisting of 4 sets of 10 repetitions at 120% of maximum voluntary contraction on the leg press, leg extension and leg flexion exercise machine. Plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels were assessed as blood markers of muscle damage. Muscle strength was examined by voluntary isokinetic knee extension using a Cybex dynamometer. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA with an alpha of 0.05.

Results

Isometric knee extension strength was significantly higher following WPH supplementation 3 (P < 0.05) and 7 (P < 0.01) days into recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage compared to CHO supplementation. In addition, strong tendencies for higher isokinetic forces (extension and flexion) were observed during the recovery period following WPH supplementation, with knee extension strength being significantly greater (P < 0.05) after 7 days recovery. Plasma LDH levels tended to be lower (P = 0.06) in the WPH supplemented group during recovery.

Conclusions

The major finding of this investigation was that whey protein isolate supplementation attenuated the impairment in isometric and isokinetic muscle forces during recovery from exercise-induced muscle injury.
© 2010 Cooke et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Keyword Human skeletal-muscle
Resistance exercise
Amino-acids
Creatine supplementation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Open-access article, no.30 ; 9 p.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 31 Oct 2010, 00:08:38 EST