Abnormal attentions toward the British royal family: Factors associated with approach and escalation

James, David V., Meloy, J. Reid., Mullen, Paul E., Pathe, Michele T., Farnham, Frank R., Preston, Lulu F. and Darnley, Brian J. (2010) Abnormal attentions toward the British royal family: Factors associated with approach and escalation. Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the law, 38 3: 329-340.


Author James, David V.
Meloy, J. Reid.
Mullen, Paul E.
Pathe, Michele T.
Farnham, Frank R.
Preston, Lulu F.
Darnley, Brian J.
Title Abnormal attentions toward the British royal family: Factors associated with approach and escalation
Journal name Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the law   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1093-6793
1943-3662
Publication date 2010-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 38
Issue 3
Start page 329
End page 340
Total pages 12
Place of publication Bloomfield, CT, U.S.A.
Publisher American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Abnormal approach and escalation from communication to physical intrusion are central concerns in managing risk to prominent people. This study was a retrospective analysis of police files of those who have shown abnormal attentions toward the British Royal Family. Approach (n = 222), compared with communication only (n = 53), was significantly associated with specific factors, most notably serious mental illness and grandiosity. In a sample of those who engaged in abnormal communication (n = 132), those who approached (n = 79) were significantly more likely to evidence mental illness and grandiosity, to use multiple communications, to employ multiple means of communication, and to be driven by motivations that concerned a personal entitlement to the prominent individual. Logistic regression produced a model comprising grandiosity, multiple communications, and multiple means of communication, for which receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis gave an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.82. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to those for other target groups. Copyright © 2010 by the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences -- Publications
Official 2011 Collection
 
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Created: Sun, 31 Oct 2010, 00:05:14 EST