Ecological restoration in Australia: Environmental discourses, landscape ideals, and the significance of human agency

Trigger, David S., Toussaint, Yann and Mulcock, Jane (2010) Ecological restoration in Australia: Environmental discourses, landscape ideals, and the significance of human agency. Society & Natural Resources, 23 11: 1060-1074. doi:10.1080/08941920903232902

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Author Trigger, David S.
Toussaint, Yann
Mulcock, Jane
Title Ecological restoration in Australia: Environmental discourses, landscape ideals, and the significance of human agency
Journal name Society & Natural Resources   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1521-0723
0894-1920
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08941920903232902
Volume 23
Issue 11
Start page 1060
End page 1074
Total pages 15
Place of publication Philadelphia, P.A., U.S.A.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract In the relatively young postsettler society of Australia, restoring nature to a pre-European ideal prompts a range of responses. We consider first the case of farmers in the southwest who reinterpret restorationist ideals as commensurate with continued productive land use. A local native species, the iconic malleefowl, is construed as a flagship for revaluing nature in a way that remains consistent with farmers' interests and sense of identity. Farmers position themselves, rather than scientists or Aboriginal people, as key stewards for managing agricultural landscapes. In comparison, restoration ideals for northern Australia center on attempts to keep “still wild”nature and Aboriginal culture intact. The invasive cane toad is reviled as “alien” in conservation-minded discourses; yet, where it has become familiar, it is also accorded positive symbolic meanings. This article illustrates the critical importance of qualitative cultural analysis in understanding the complexities of human agency in environmental management.
Keyword Australia
Cultural values
Ecological restoration
Nativeness
Nature
Conservation
Nativeness
Knowledge
Responses
Horses
Debate
Plants
Place
Alien
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 12 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 31 Oct 2010, 00:02:41 EST