Climate change, flooding, urbanisation and leptospirosis: Fuelling the fire?

Lau, Colleen L., Smythe, Lee D., Craig, Scott B. and Weinstein, Philip (2010) Climate change, flooding, urbanisation and leptospirosis: Fuelling the fire?. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 104 10: 631-638. doi:10.1016/j.trstmh.2010.07.002


Author Lau, Colleen L.
Smythe, Lee D.
Craig, Scott B.
Weinstein, Philip
Title Climate change, flooding, urbanisation and leptospirosis: Fuelling the fire?
Journal name Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0035-9203
1878-3503
Publication date 2010-10
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.trstmh.2010.07.002
Volume 104
Issue 10
Start page 631
End page 638
Total pages 8
Editor Alexandra Hay
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Flooding and heavy rainfall have been associated with numerous outbreaks of leptospirosis around the world. With global climate change, extreme weather events such as cyclones and floods are expected to occur with increasing frequency and greater intensity and may potentially result in an upsurge in the disease incidence as well as the magnitude of leptospirosis outbreaks. In this paper, we examine mechanisms by which climate change can affect various ecological factors that are likely to drive an increase in the overall incidence as well as the frequency of outbreaks of leptospirosis. We will discuss the geographical areas that are most likely to be at risk of an increase in leptospirosis disease burden owing to the coexistence of climate change hazard risk, environmental drivers of leptospirosis outbreaks, local socioeconomic circumstances, and social and demographic trends. To reduce this disease burden, enhanced surveillance and further research is required to understand the environmental drivers of infection, to build capacity in emergency response and to promote community adaptation to a changing climate.
© 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
Keyword Leptospirosis
Ecology
Epidemiology
Zoonosis
Climate change
Emerging diseases
Linked-immunosorbent-assay
Seychelles indian-ocean
Asia-pacific region
Human health
Epidemic leptospirosis
Controlled-trial
United-states
Risk-factors
Outbreak
Disease
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 84 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 31 Oct 2010, 00:01:39 EST