Predictors of job satisfaction: attributional style, social problem-solving skills, and sex-role orientation

Ellis, David S. (1994). Predictors of job satisfaction: attributional style, social problem-solving skills, and sex-role orientation Honours Thesis, School of Business, University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ellis, David S.
Thesis Title Predictors of job satisfaction: attributional style, social problem-solving skills, and sex-role orientation
School, Centre or Institute School of Business
Institution University of Queensland
Publication date 1994
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Total pages 136
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract
This research examines attributes of individuals as predictors of job satisfaction, and forms part of a larger cross-cultural study. Based on the literature, attributional style, social problem-solving skills and sex-role orientation are expected to interact and have implications for job satisfaction. The purpose of this research is to devise and empirically test an interactional model of the relationships. One hundred participants from several organisations completed a survey instrument, the data from which was used to test some of the implications of the model. In general, results provide support for the model and the theory. However, it is apparent that attributions for the causes of positive events are different in nature to attributions for the causes of negative events. For positive events, it seems clear that an optimistic attributional style, positive problem orientation and problem-solving skills, and an instrumental sex-role orientation are positively related to job satisfaction. Whilst interactional hypotheses were generally confirmed, linear modelling raises doubts as to the parsimony and predictive ability of the model.

 
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