Time in groups : group development, time management, appraised structured use of time, and group effectiveness

Chang, Artemis C. F. (2001). Time in groups : group development, time management, appraised structured use of time, and group effectiveness PhD Thesis, School of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Chang, Artemis C. F.
Thesis Title Time in groups : group development, time management, appraised structured use of time, and group effectiveness
School, Centre or Institute School of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2001
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Supervisor Prashant Bordia
Julie Duck
Total pages 290
Language eng
Subjects 150305 Human Resources Management
150311 Organisational Behaviour
Formatted abstract       This thesis investigated the element of time in groups. At the macro level, developmental patterns of project teams were studied and a linear progressive and a non-sequential model of group development were consolidated. I proposed and found that the integrative model (Wheelan, 1994) (a linear progressive model) and the punctuated equilibrium model (Gersick, 1988, 1989) (non-sequential model) of group development are complementary rather than contradictory in nature. At the micro level, temporal changes in groups' awareness and perception of time, and time management activities were investigated. I developed a taxonomy of "group-level" time management activities and investigated the developmental pattern of group time management behaviours. Across both levels of analysis, micro and macro, the inter-relationships among group development, group time management, and group effectiveness were investigated, as was the mediating effect of group appraised structured use of time (i.e., a group's belief of structured use of time). A combination of two in-depth laboratory observational studies (Studies 1 & 2), and four cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys with field samples (Studies 3a, 3b, 3c, & 3d) were conducted. It was found that whereas group development predicted group effectiveness via the mediating effect of appraised structured use of time, group time management did not. Furthermore, specific dimensions of group development predicted corresponding dimensions of group effectiveness over and above the mediating effect of group appraised structured use of time.

      The contributions of this dissertation are: (a) Development of a new multidimensional definition space of group development, (b) Consolidation of the punctuated equilibrium model and the integrative model of group development, thus, clarifying a misunderstanding in the literature that depicts them as competing rather than as complementary models, (c) Development of a taxonomy for studying group-level time management behaviour, (d) Development of a new theoretical framework of time in groups.
Keyword Teams in the workplace -- Time management.
Additional Notes Page#63 is not present.

 
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