Mood and substance use disorders among adults seeking speech treatment for stuttering

Iverach, Lisa, Jones, Mark, O'Brian, Sue, Block, Susan, Lincoln, Michelle, Harrison, Elisabeth, Hewat, Sally, Menzies, Ross G., Packman, Ann and Onslow, Mark (2010) Mood and substance use disorders among adults seeking speech treatment for stuttering. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 53 5: 1178-1190. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0166)


Author Iverach, Lisa
Jones, Mark
O'Brian, Sue
Block, Susan
Lincoln, Michelle
Harrison, Elisabeth
Hewat, Sally
Menzies, Ross G.
Packman, Ann
Onslow, Mark
Title Mood and substance use disorders among adults seeking speech treatment for stuttering
Journal name Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1092-4388
1558-9102
Publication date 2010-10
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0166)
Volume 53
Issue 5
Start page 1178
End page 1190
Total pages 13
Place of publication Rockville, MD, United States
Publisher American Speech - Language - Hearing Association
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: Stuttering has been associated with a range of anxiety disorders, including social phobia. In the general community, anxiety disorders are frequently associated with increased rates of mood and substance use disorders. Therefore, in the present study, the authors sought to determine the rate of mood and substance use disorders among adults who stutter.

Method: The study employed a matched case–control design. Participants included 92 adults seeking treatment for stuttering and 920 age- and gender-matched controls. Mental health assessments were conducted via a computerized psychiatric diagnostic interview. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios for the prevalence of mood and substance use disorders in both groups.

Results: When compared with matched controls, adults seeking treatment for stuttering had twofold increased odds of meeting criteria for a 12-month diagnosis of any mood disorder but were not found to report significantly higher lifetime prevalence rates for any substance use disorder.

Conclusions: Although adults who stutter in the present study were characterized by significantly higher rates of mood disorders than matched controls, they do not appear to self-medicate with substances such as alcohol. Results are discussed in terms of treatment implications and possible reasons why adults who stutter may avoid alcohol.
© American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Keyword Stuttering
Mood disorders
Substance use
Alcohol use
Anxiety
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 17 Oct 2010, 00:06:36 EST