Economics, health promotion expenditure and acute myocardial infarction mortality in Australia

Howell, Tegwen Eleanor James. (1992). Economics, health promotion expenditure and acute myocardial infarction mortality in Australia Master's Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Howell, Tegwen Eleanor James.
Thesis Title Economics, health promotion expenditure and acute myocardial infarction mortality in Australia
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1992
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Total pages 150
Language eng
Subjects 1402 Applied Economics
Formatted abstract Acute myocardial infarction is the primary cause of death in Australia. The costs associated with this disease are extremely high and they place a considerable burden on Australian society, in terms of their associated economic and opportunity costs. Therefore, there have been calls for increased expenditure on health promotion and illness prevention aimed at encouraging Australians to change their lifestyle so as to reduce the risk of suffering from acute myocardial infarction. The basis for this argument, being that prevention is better than cure.

The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a significant direct relationship between health promotion and illness prevention expenditures and acute myocardial infarction mortality, in Australia. The study tests the central proposition of the model that, in conjunction with lifestyle and other health expenditures, health promotion and illness prevention expenditures are related to acute myocardial infarction mortality.

This relationship will be tested, in a number of linear regression models, using annual data representing acute myocardial infarction mortality and nine explanatory variables. However, these analyses do not allow for statements regarding causation.


 
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