Black and white : policy implications of Queensland Aboriginal welfare interventions : economic analysis, theoretical expansion, and econometric assessment of welfare, income, and well being

Davidoff, Laura. (2007). Black and white : policy implications of Queensland Aboriginal welfare interventions : economic analysis, theoretical expansion, and econometric assessment of welfare, income, and well being Master's Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Davidoff, Laura.
Thesis Title Black and white : policy implications of Queensland Aboriginal welfare interventions : economic analysis, theoretical expansion, and econometric assessment of welfare, income, and well being
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2007
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Total pages 240
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract Under what has been deemed the Protection Acts, Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander individuals were considered wards of state in Queensland from 1897 through the late 1970s resulting in the rigorous control over Aboriginal individuals by the Queensland government. Through a complex system of settlements, reserves, .missions, and trust accounts, Aboriginal earned wages were often misused, misappropriated, and through corrupt measures, stolen. Additionally, this system and welfare initiatives created several market distortions, hindered Aboriginal consumer sovereignty, and produced obstructions to free market participation through perpetuated welfare dependency.

This thesis investigates the implications these policies had on Aboriginal Queensland and the overall State. Analytical techniques including econometric analysis, data analysis, and theoretical analysis are used to critique major welfare policies in Queensland over the past century, and provide insights for future policy recommendations. It is found that government intervention in Queensland resulted in many perverse economic and social outcomes, largely due to a lack of institutional and cultural understanding, and of a theoretical welfare framework.

Attempts are made to expand theoretical models, such as the growth model, and use traditional economic tools for the unique analysis of Aboriginal disadvantage.

 
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