The effects of terms of trade volatility on trade and economic growth : a case study of Malawi

Kumbatira, Andrew. (1997). The effects of terms of trade volatility on trade and economic growth : a case study of Malawi Master's Thesis, School of Economics, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Kumbatira, Andrew.
Thesis Title The effects of terms of trade volatility on trade and economic growth : a case study of Malawi
School, Centre or Institute School of Economics
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 1997
Thesis type Master's Thesis
Total pages 113
Language eng
Subjects 14 Economics
Formatted abstract Since the publication of the Prebisch-Singer hypothesis, the Less Developed Countries (LDCs) maintain that their primary product exports are subject to large fluctuations in price and volume and that the high degree of concentration in exports makes their economies vulnerable to external disturbances.

Although exceptions can be found, it is generally agreed that export prices, quantities and total earnings are all more unstable in the average poor countries such as Malawi than in the average rich ones. Fluctuations tend to be even greater for individual commodities than for indexes and it is the individual commodity that matter for a country that depends on only one or two exports.

This thesis has attempted to investigate whether the volatility of terms of trade is having adverse effects on Malawi's economic growth and trade. The results of this study seem to indicate that volatility in terms of trade has adverse effects on trade and economic growth and probably this operates through changes in expectations.

Document type: Thesis
Collection: UQ Theses (non-RHD) - UQ staff and students only
 
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Created: Fri, 08 Oct 2010, 14:42:17 EST by Muhammad Noman Ali on behalf of Social Sciences and Humanities Library Service