Unreliable signals of strength in male slender crayfish (Cherax dispar): costs of enlarged claws and the importance of resources during disputes

Wilson, R. S., Oliver, J., Goldizen, A. and Blomberg, S. (2009). Unreliable signals of strength in male slender crayfish (Cherax dispar): costs of enlarged claws and the importance of resources during disputes. In: Abstracts of the Annual Meeting of the Society form Integrative and Comparative Biology. Annual Meeting of the Society form Integrative and Comparative Biology, Boston, MA, United States, (e183-e183). 3-7 January 2009. doi:10.1093/icb/icp002


Author Wilson, R. S.
Oliver, J.
Goldizen, A.
Blomberg, S.
Title of paper Unreliable signals of strength in male slender crayfish (Cherax dispar): costs of enlarged claws and the importance of resources during disputes
Conference name Annual Meeting of the Society form Integrative and Comparative Biology
Conference location Boston, MA, United States
Conference dates 3-7 January 2009
Proceedings title Abstracts of the Annual Meeting of the Society form Integrative and Comparative Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Integrative and Comparative Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Oxford, United Kingdom,
Publisher Oxford University Press
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Oral presentation
DOI 10.1093/icb/icp002
ISSN 1540-7063
1557-7023
Volume 49
Issue Supp. 1
Start page e183
End page e183
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Unreliable signals of weapon strength are considered problematic for
signalling theory and reliable signals are predicted to be the dominant form of
signalling among conspecifics in nature. Previous studies have shown males
of the Australian freshwater crayfish (Cherax dispar) routinely use unreliable
signals of strength during simple experimental confrontations. We
investigated the possibility that functional trade-offs associated with enlarged
weaponry may be important in reducing any benefits for unreliable signaling.
We found swimming speed was negatively correlated with chela size for
males, but not females, suggesting a functional trade-off exists for males
only. Decreases in swimming speed with increases in weapon size, suggest
there could be important fitness costs associated with larger chelae. In
addition, we examined whether unreliable signals of strength remain effective
during confrontations in the presence of two different perceived resources
(shelter and territory). Like previous studies of C. dispar, chela size was the
most accurate predictor of the decision to engage in a fight and of eventual
dominance. However, males whose chelae represented an unreliable signal
of strength (i.e. poor strength for a given chela size), were less likely to
decide to fight when in the presence of a shelter. Overall, territory ownership
and the presence of shelter significantly decreased the probability of males
deciding to fight; whereas these factors did not significantly affect the
likelihood that males established dominance.
Subjects 06 Biological Sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Note: DOI includes all oral abstracts presented at conference.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 05 Oct 2010, 15:11:15 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty of Science