People with recurrent LBP respond differently to trunk loading despite remission from symptoms

MacDonald, David, Moseley, G. Lorimer and Hodges. Paul W. (2010) People with recurrent LBP respond differently to trunk loading despite remission from symptoms. Spine, 35 7: 818-824. doi:10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181bc98f1

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Author MacDonald, David
Moseley, G. Lorimer
Hodges. Paul W.
Title People with recurrent LBP respond differently to trunk loading despite remission from symptoms
Journal name Spine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0362-2436
1528-1159
Publication date 2010-04-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181bc98f1
Volume 35
Issue 7
Start page 818
End page 824
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Formatted abstract
Study Design. Cross-sectional design.
Objective. To compare lumbar multifidus electromyographic
activity (EMG) during predictable and unpredictable
trunk loading between people with and without recurrent
unilateral low back pain (LBP) during symptom
remission.
Summary of Background Data. Unpredictable loading
is a common injury mechanism for LBP. Paraspinal muscle
responses to trunk loading differ between people with
and without a history of LBP, but whether the response
differs between specific regions within the paraspinal
muscles is unclear. Differences between deep (DM) and
superficial fibers (SM) of multifidus have been implicated
in other tasks. It is unknown whether DM and SM EMG
differ between people in remission from recurrent LBP
and healthy people during trunk loading.
Methods. DM and SM EMG was recorded bilaterally at
L5 with intramuscular electrodes during predictable and
unpredictable trunk loading and compared during 10 milliseconds
epochs (250 milliseconds before to 150 milliseconds
after loading) between sides, loading conditions,
and groups.
Results.
DM EMG increased above baseline before
and after predictable load onset, but returned to baseline
at the time of impact. Both DM EMG bursts were less in
the remission group and less on the non-painful side.
Peak SM EMG amplitude on the previously painful side
was earlier in the remission group than healthy participants.
DM and SM EMG were less after unpredictable
load onset in the remission group than healthy participants.
Conclusion. Despite symptom remission, DM EMG
during predictable loading and DM and SM EMG during
unpredictable loading were less in people with recurrent
LBP than healthy participants. © 2010, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2011 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 30 Sep 2010, 01:45:19 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences