Impacts of grazing, selective logging and hyper-aggressors on diurnal bird fauna in intact forest landscapes of the Brigalow Belt, Queensland

Eyre, Teresa J., Maron, Martine, Mathieson, Michael T. and Haseler, Murray (2009) Impacts of grazing, selective logging and hyper-aggressors on diurnal bird fauna in intact forest landscapes of the Brigalow Belt, Queensland. Austral Ecology, 34 6: 705-716. doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2009.01979.x


Author Eyre, Teresa J.
Maron, Martine
Mathieson, Michael T.
Haseler, Murray
Title Impacts of grazing, selective logging and hyper-aggressors on diurnal bird fauna in intact forest landscapes of the Brigalow Belt, Queensland
Journal name Austral Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1442-9985
1442-9993
0307-692X
Publication date 2009-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2009.01979.x
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 705
End page 716
Total pages 12
Editor Michael Bull
Place of publication Carlton, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Language eng
Subject 0502 Environmental Science and Management
0602 Ecology
Formatted abstract
The impact of forest management on diurnal bird assemblages and abundance was investigated in contiguous tracts of eucalypt forest in the Brigalow Belt Bioregion, south central Queensland. Sites were located across three levels of livestock grazing intensity and three levels of selective logging intensity within the most extensive habitat type, Corymbia citriodora-dominant forest. We recorded a high rate of incidence and large numbers of the hyper-aggressive noisy miner Manorina melanocephala (Passeriformes: Meliphagidae) at the majority of our survey sites, a phenomenon rarely reported in non-cleared landscapes. As shown by numerous studies in fragmented landscapes, the distribution of this species in our study had a substantial negative effect upon the distribution of small passerine species. Noisy miners exerted the strongest influence upon small passerine abundance, and masked any forest management effects. However, key habitat features important for small passerines were identified, including a relatively high density of large trees and stems in the midstorey. Selective logging appeared to exert a minimal effect upon noisy miner abundance, whereas grazing intensity had a profound, positive influence. Noisy miners were most abundant in intensively grazed forest with minimal midstorey and a low volume of coarse woody debris. Higher road density in the forest landscape also corresponded with increased numbers of noisy miners. Reduction in grazing pressure in Brigalow Belt forests has the potential to benefit small passerine assemblages across large areas through moderating noisy miner abundance. The strong relationship between noisy miners and small passerines suggests that noisy miner abundance could act as an easily measured indicator of forest condition, potentially contributing to monitoring of forest management outcomes.
© 2009 Ecological Society of Australia.
Keyword Grazing
Habitat selection
Noisy miner
Road
Selective logging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 27 Sep 2010, 14:26:57 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty of Science