Perceptions of discriminatory treatment by staff as predictors of drug treatment completion: Utility of a mixed methods approach

Brener, Loren, von Hippel, William, von Hippel, Courtney, Resnick, Ilyse and Treloar, Carla (2010) Perceptions of discriminatory treatment by staff as predictors of drug treatment completion: Utility of a mixed methods approach. Drug and Alcohol Review, 29 5: 491-497. doi:10.1111/j.1465-3362.2010.00173.x


Author Brener, Loren
von Hippel, William
von Hippel, Courtney
Resnick, Ilyse
Treloar, Carla
Title Perceptions of discriminatory treatment by staff as predictors of drug treatment completion: Utility of a mixed methods approach
Journal name Drug and Alcohol Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0959-5236
1465-3362
Publication date 2010-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2010.00173.x
Volume 29
Issue 5
Start page 491
End page 497
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction and Aims. Staff interactions with their clients are an important factor in the quality of care that is provided
to people in drug treatment.Yet there is very little research that addresses staff attitudes or clients’ perceptions of discrimination
and prejudice by staff with regard to treatment outcomes.This research aimed to assess whether perceptions of discrimination by
staff predict drug treatment completion.Design and Methods.The study used a mixed methods approach. Ninety-two clients
in residential rehabilitation facilities in Sydney were administered a series of quantitative measures assessing drug history,
severity of drug use, treatment history, perceptions of staff discrimination and treatment motivation. Clients were followed up
regularly until an outcome (dropout or completion) was obtained for the full sample. Results. Perceptions of discrimination
were a significant predictor of treatment completion, with greater perceived discrimination associated with increased dropout.
Qualitative interviews with 13 clients and eight health-care workers from these treatment services were then conducted to gain
insight into how perceived discrimination may impact on treatment experiences. Clients and staff discussed how they would
address the issue of perceived discrimination during the current treatment experience. Discussion and Conclusions.
Adopting a mixed methods approach facilitated exploration of the impact of perceived discrimination on treatment from both
clients’ and health-care workers’ perspectives.This methodology may also enhance interpretation and utilisation of these findings
in drug treatment.
© 2010 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs
Keyword Drug treatment
Perceived discrimination
Attitudes
Treatment outcomes
Mixed methods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 26 Sep 2010, 10:07:18 EST