Socio-demographic correlates of prolonged television viewing time in Australian men and women: The AusDiab study

Clark, Bronwyn Kay, Sugiyama, Takemi, Healy, Genevieve N., Salmon, Jo, Dunstan, David W., Shaw, Jonathan E., Zimmet, Paul Z. and Owen, Neville (2010) Socio-demographic correlates of prolonged television viewing time in Australian men and women: The AusDiab study. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 7 5: 595-601.

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Author Clark, Bronwyn Kay
Sugiyama, Takemi
Healy, Genevieve N.
Salmon, Jo
Dunstan, David W.
Shaw, Jonathan E.
Zimmet, Paul Z.
Owen, Neville
Title Socio-demographic correlates of prolonged television viewing time in Australian men and women: The AusDiab study
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2010-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 7
Issue 5
Start page 595
End page 601
Total pages 7
Place of publication Champaign, IL, U.S.A.
Publisher Human Kinetics Publishers
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background:
Sedentary behaviors, particularly television viewing (TV) time, are associated with adverse health outcomes in adults, independent of physical activity levels. These associations are stronger and more consistent for women than for men.

Methods:
Multivariate regression models examined the sociodemographic correlates of 2 categories of TV time (≥2 hours/day and ≥4 hours/day); in a large, population-based sample of Australian adults (4950 men, 6001 women; mean age 48.1 years, range 25–91) who participated in the 1999/2000 Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle (AusDiab) study.

Results:
Some 46% of men and 40% of women watched ≥ 2 hours TV/day; 9% and 6% respectively watched ≥ 4 hours/day. For both men and women, ≥2 hours TV/day was associated with less than tertiary education, living outside of state capital cities, and having no paid employment. For women, mid and older age (45–64 and 65+) were also significant correlates of ≥2 hours TV/day. Similar patterns of association were observed in those viewing ≥4 hours/day.

Conclusions:

Prolonged TV time is associated with indices of social disadvantage and older age. These findings can inform the understanding of potential contextual influences and guide preventive initiatives.
(c)2010 Human Kinetics, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Keyword Television
Gender
Demographics
AusDiab
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 26 Sep 2010, 00:04:41 EST