Respiratory bacterial pathogens in the nasopharynx and lower airways of australian indigenous children with bronchiectasis

Kim M. Hare, Grimwood, Keith, Leach, Amanda J., Smith-Vaughan, Heidi, Torzillo, Paul J., Morris, Peter S. and Chang, Anne B. (2010) Respiratory bacterial pathogens in the nasopharynx and lower airways of australian indigenous children with bronchiectasis. The Journal of Pediatrics, 157 6: 1001-1005. doi:10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.06.002


Author Kim M. Hare
Grimwood, Keith
Leach, Amanda J.
Smith-Vaughan, Heidi
Torzillo, Paul J.
Morris, Peter S.
Chang, Anne B.
Title Respiratory bacterial pathogens in the nasopharynx and lower airways of australian indigenous children with bronchiectasis
Journal name The Journal of Pediatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-3476
1097-6833
1085-8695
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jpeds.2010.06.002
Volume 157
Issue 6
Start page 1001
End page 1005
Total pages 5
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Mosby
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To test the hypothesis that bacterial density, strain diversity, and concordance of pathogens between upper and lower airways are higher in children with bronchiectasis than in those with non-bronchiectatic conditions.

Study design: Nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid were cultured from 45 Indigenous children with bronchiectasis and 30 non-Indigenous children with non-bronchiectatic respiratory symptoms. Lower airway infection was defined as >104 colony-forming units (CFU) of respiratory bacteria/mL of BAL fluid. Concordance was determined by phenotype or genotype.

Results: NP carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nontypable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), and Moraxella catarrhalis, and lower airway infection by NTHi (47% vs 3%), were detected significantly more often in the children with bronchiectasis than in those without this condition. BAL specimens from the infected Indigenous children also showed greater strain diversity (71%vs 0%). Strain concordance in NP and BAL cultures was high in both infected subgroups.

Conclusions: The high density and diversity of respiratory bacteria, along with strain concordance between upper and lower airways, found in Indigenous children with bronchiectasis suggest a possible pathogenic role of recurrent aspiration of NP secretions. © 2010 Mosby Inc. All rights reserved.
Keyword Bronchoalveolar lavage
Chest high-resolution computed tomography
Colony-forming unit
Confidence interval
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 21 Sep 2010, 12:40:21 EST by Thelma Whitbourne on behalf of Child Health Research Centre