A high-throughput assay to measure sensorimotor gating (PPI) in Drosophila

Van Alphen, B., Burne, T. H. J., Eyles, D. W., Mattingley, J., McGrath, J. J. and van Swinderen, B. (2010). A high-throughput assay to measure sensorimotor gating (PPI) in Drosophila. In: ANS/AuPS 2010 – the 30th Annual Meeting of the Australian Neuroscience Society, in conjunction with the 50th Anniversary Meeting of the Australian Physiological Society, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (172-172). 31 January - 2 February 2010.

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Author Van Alphen, B.
Burne, T. H. J.
Eyles, D. W.
Mattingley, J.
McGrath, J. J.
van Swinderen, B.
Title of paper A high-throughput assay to measure sensorimotor gating (PPI) in Drosophila
Conference name ANS/AuPS 2010 – the 30th Annual Meeting of the Australian Neuroscience Society, in conjunction with the 50th Anniversary Meeting of the Australian Physiological Society
Conference location Sydney, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 31 January - 2 February 2010
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Poster
Start page 172
End page 172
Total pages 1
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Introduction: In every day life, sensory systems are exposed to an incredible amount of information. To protect the brain from being overwhelmed, this information is filtered so only relevant information gets processed and transformed into action. Sensorimotor gating is one such filter mechanism. It refers to the state-dependent regulation of transmission, or gating, of sensory information to motor systems. Impairments in sensorimotor gating, such as pre-pulse inhibition (PPI), have been described in several psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia, autism and ADHD.

Methods:
We study sensorimotor gating in Drosophila with a high-throughput behavioral paradigm that allows us to measure motor responses to moving visual stimuli in walking fruit flies. Groups of 25-30 flies are loaded into a maze placed over a screen showing moving visual stimuli. Flies move through the maze and pass eight successive left/right choice points after which they emerge in one of nine end tubes
where they are counted. The average response is the Optomotor Index (OI). We measured the effect of briefly flashed visual stimuli on OI in two wildtype Drosophila strains: Canton-S and Berlin.

Results:
Flash duration varied from 13-106 ms (n=240 per condition). In both strains, only 40 ms black flashes against a green background significantly reduced OI. Additionally, fly behavior was recorded using custom-made fly-tracking software. During 40 ms black flashes, behavior changed considerably. Flies spend longer in the maze and backtracked more.

Conclusions
: We are currently investigating whether this behavioral change can be suppressed with a low intensity visual pre-pulse, in order to create a model of PPI in the fly. The development of such a model could be of enormous use given PPI deficits are considered a viable endophenotype of schizophrenia.

Subjects 1109 Neurosciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Poster number: POS-TUE-171

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Sep 2010, 15:14:20 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty of Science