Does the complexity of the rumen microbial ecology preclude methane mitigation?

Wright, André-Denis G. and Klieve, Athol V. (2011). Does the complexity of the rumen microbial ecology preclude methane mitigation?. In: T. A. McAllister, K. A. Beauchemin, X. Hao, S. McGinn and P. H. Robinson, Special Issue: Greenhouse Gases in Animal Agriculture - Finding a Balance between Food and Emissions. GGAA2010: 4th International Conference on Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture Conference, Banff, Alberta, Canada, (248-253). 3-8 October 2010. doi:10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2011.04.015

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Author Wright, André-Denis G.
Klieve, Athol V.
Title of paper Does the complexity of the rumen microbial ecology preclude methane mitigation?
Conference name GGAA2010: 4th International Conference on Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture Conference
Conference location Banff, Alberta, Canada
Conference dates 3-8 October 2010
Proceedings title Special Issue: Greenhouse Gases in Animal Agriculture - Finding a Balance between Food and Emissions   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Animal Feed Science and Technology   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/j.anifeedsci.2011.04.015
ISSN 0377-8401
1873-2216
Editor T. A. McAllister
K. A. Beauchemin
X. Hao
S. McGinn
P. H. Robinson
Volume 166-167
Start page 248
End page 253
Total pages 6
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Ruminant livestock are responsible for production of a portion of greenhouse gases, particularly methane (61Tg/yr) which is believed to contribute to global warming and climate change. Methane is an end product of fermentation of plant material by the microbial ecosystem in the rumen. Methanogenesis is undertaken by methanogenic archaea and is a mechanism by which H2 is removed from fermentation in order to regenerate biochemical co-factors such as NAD+. The microbial ecosystem is very complex and involves thousands of species of bacteria (1010-1011cells/ml), archaea (107-109cells/ml), protozoa (104-106cells/ml), fungi (103-106cells/ml), and viruses (109-1010cells/ml), which interact with the feed, their host and each other. This ecosystem is relatively poorly understood, particularly inter-species interactions and interactions with the host. Less than 15% of the microbial species in the gastrointestinal tract have been cultured and characterised. However, knowledge of this ecosystem is accumulating, particularly with the advent of molecular biology and culture independent technologies. New high throughput sequencing methodologies, such as pyrosequencing, will greatly improve the rate of knowledge acquisition and techniques such as Stable Isotope Probing will enhance our ability to understand species inter-relationships. While we can expect an increase in our knowledge of this complex ecosystem, and an improved ability to predictably lower CH4 emissions, examples of successful reductions already exist, including use of feeds (e.g., cereal grains) and chemical additives (e.g., 2-bromo-ethane sulfonate, bromochloromethane). Achieving meaningful reductions in CH4 emissions may be possible with advances in our knowledge of the intricacies of this complex ecosystem.
Keyword Rumen microbiome
Archaea
Methanogens
Methane
Pyrosequencing
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Sep 2010, 11:24:38 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Animal Studies