Malnutrition and pressure ulcer risk in adults in Australian health care facilities

Banks, Merrilyn, Bauer, Judith, Graves, Nicholas and Ash, Susan (2010) Malnutrition and pressure ulcer risk in adults in Australian health care facilities. Nutrition, 26 9: 896-901. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2009.09.024


Author Banks, Merrilyn
Bauer, Judith
Graves, Nicholas
Ash, Susan
Title Malnutrition and pressure ulcer risk in adults in Australian health care facilities
Journal name Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0899-9007
1873-1244
Publication date 2010-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.nut.2009.09.024
Volume 26
Issue 9
Start page 896
End page 901
Total pages 6
Place of publication Burbank, CA, U.S.A.
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
Formatted abstract
Objective: To determine the effect of nutritional status on the presence and severity of pressure ulcer.
Methods: A multicenter, cross-sectional audit of nutritional status of a convenience sample of subjects was carried out as part of a large audit of pressure ulcers in a sample of Queensland, Australia, public healthcare facilities in 2002 and 2003. Dietitians in 20 hospitals and 6 residential aged care facilities conducted single-day nutritional status audits of 2208 acute and 839 aged care subjects using the Subjective Global Assessment. The effect of nutritional status on the presence and severity (highest stage and number of pressure ulcers) was determined by logistic regression in a model controlling for age, gender, medical specialty, and facility location. The potential clustering effect of facility was accounted for in the model using an analysis of correlated data approach.
Results: Subjects with malnutrition had adjusted odds ratios of 2.6 (95% confidence interval 1.8–3.5, P < 0.001) of having a pressure ulcer in acute care facilities and 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.5–2.7, P < 0.001) for residential aged care facilities. There was also increased odds ratio of having a pressure ulcer, and having a more severe pressure ulcer (higher stage pressure ulcer and/or a higher number) with increased severity of malnutrition.
Conclusion: Malnutrition was associated with at least twice the odds ratio of having a pressure ulcer of in public health care facilities in Queensland. Action must be taken to identify, prevent, and treat malnutrition, especially in patients at risk of pressure ulcer.
©2010 Published by Elsevier Inc

Keyword Pressure ulcer
Nutritional status
Malnutrition
Subjective Global Assessment
Hospitalized adults
Residential aged care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 42 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 49 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 13 Sep 2010, 12:06:50 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences