The link between sleep problems in infancy and early childhood and attention problems at 5 and 14 years: Evidence from a birth cohort study

O'Callaghan, Frances V., Al Mamun, Abdullah, O'Callaghan, Michael, Clavarino, Alexandra, Williams, Gail M., Bor, William, Heussler, Helen and Najman, Jake M. (2010) The link between sleep problems in infancy and early childhood and attention problems at 5 and 14 years: Evidence from a birth cohort study. Early Human Development, 86 7: 419-424. doi:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2010.05.020


Author O'Callaghan, Frances V.
Al Mamun, Abdullah
O'Callaghan, Michael
Clavarino, Alexandra
Williams, Gail M.
Bor, William
Heussler, Helen
Najman, Jake M.
Title The link between sleep problems in infancy and early childhood and attention problems at 5 and 14 years: Evidence from a birth cohort study
Journal name Early Human Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-3782
1872-6232
Publication date 2010-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2010.05.020
Volume 86
Issue 7
Start page 419
End page 424
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier/North Holland
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Background: Little research has examined the associations between early sleep problems and attention problems over several developmental periods. Aims: To examine whether sleep problems in infancy and early childhood are independently related to attention difficulty at 5 and 14. years, and to the continuity of attention difficulties from 5 to 14. years. Study design: The study was a prospective, population-based birth cohort study. Subjects: 7223 women who delivered a live, singleton child between 1981 and 1983 were recruited at the first antenatal visit. Of these, 4204 had complete information on all key measures. Outcome measures: Attention problems were assessed with items from the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and were classified as adolescent onset (i.e. problems at 14 but not at 5); early remitter (problems at 5, no problem at 14); and persistent (i.e. at both 5 and 14). Results: At 6. months, sleep problems 'sometimes' were associated with the early remitter group in boys. For sleep problems between 2 and 4. years of age, findings were generally similar for boys and girls with strong associations with adolescent attention. Sleep problems 'often' were independently associated with early remitter and persistent attention problems, and 'sometimes' with early remitter and adolescent onset attention problems. Conclusions: Sleep problems in early childhood are an indicator of subsequent attention problems that may persist into adolescence. Whether these associations are causal requires further research, however their presence provides an opportunity for early intervention and monitoring. © 2010.
Keyword Adolescence
Attention
Cohort study
Children
Preschool
Sleep
Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
School-age-children
Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder
Adverse Associations
Behavior problems
Mater-university
Young-children
Pregnancy
Parent
Life
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Received 15 February 2010; revised 10 May 2010; accepted 18 May 2010. Available online 19 June 2010.

 
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Created: Sun, 12 Sep 2010, 00:05:31 EST