Lateralised visual processing in domestic cattle herds responding to novel and familiar stimuli

Robins, Andrew and Phillips, Clive (2010) Lateralised visual processing in domestic cattle herds responding to novel and familiar stimuli. Laterality, 15 5: 514-534. doi:10.1080/13576500903049324


Author Robins, Andrew
Phillips, Clive
Title Lateralised visual processing in domestic cattle herds responding to novel and familiar stimuli
Journal name Laterality   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1357-650X
1464-0678
Publication date 2010-09
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13576500903049324
Volume 15
Issue 5
Start page 514
End page 534
Total pages 21
Place of publication Hove, E Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Psychology Press
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract We investigated whether cattle exhibit preferences to monitor challenging and novel stimuli. Experiments were conducted on dairy and beef cattle herds and revealed significant left eye preferences in the cattle for viewing an experimenter walking to repeatedly split the herd through its centre. Visual lateralisation was demonstrated in the preference to use the left monocular field to monitor the experimenter, alone or equipped with a range of novel stimuli. This finding is consistent with left eye preferences found in various species of mammals, birds, and amphibians respond- ing to predators and novel stimuli. A cohort of the familiarised cattle herds was then subjected to additional herd-splitting tests with the same stimuli and demonstrated a reversal of viewing preferences, preferring to monitor the experimenter and stimuli within the right and not left monocular field. This directional shift in viewing preferences is consistent with experience-dependent learning found in lateralised visual processing in other, non-mammalian, species, and to our knowledge is the first of such studies to suggest that such lateralised learning processes also exist in mammals. Together the data support a number of key hypotheses concerning the evolution and conservation of lateralised brain function in vertebrates, and also provide important considerations for livestock handling. © 2009 Psychology Press.
Keyword Lateralisation
Vision
Adaptation
Livestock
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published on: 23 July 2009 (iFirst)

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 12 Sep 2010, 00:02:53 EST